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Children’s Programs

    Kid's Programs Programs

    In the Tall, Tall Grass: A Class Visit

    tallgrass

     

    I’ve been wandering through my flash drive looking for successful programs to share with you all and this was one of my favorites. I’m especially proud of it because school age is the group I have the least confidence with after so many years doing teen.

    Remember when I talked about our Winter Reading Club featuring Ohio authors? I had the pleasure of hosting a group of second and third graders from a local charter school during that time and created this program based on Denise Fleming’s In the Tall, Tall Grass for them.¬†

    I set up the room so that chairs were in a horseshoe shape facing the front. At that small branch the meeting room wasn’t big enough to have the whole class at tables and chairs.

    After introducing myself and sharing a bit about the library I started by reading the big book version of In the Tall, Tall Grass.

    After reading the book I passed out a readers’ theater script adapted from the book. A child would read one line from the book, like “Crunch, munch, caterpillars munch” and then all together we would repeat “In the tall, tall grass.” ¬†This continued with a single line and the group response for all the lines in the book.

    To finish our session we did a craft/writing activity based on the book. Each student picked an animal and constructed a sentence in the style of the book: Blank, Blank, Animal Blanks. The children wrote their sentence on the top of the paper and drew a picture of their animal below it. I then passed out strips of green construction paper that I had pre-cut. The students glued them over their picture so their animal was peeking out.

     

    Writing Wednesdays

    Writing Wednesday: Robot Rock

    robotrock

    This is a fun and creative project for elementary age kids, and it’s so simple and cheap.

    1. First is the fun part: Give the kids a large sheet of paper and make a lot of craft supply odds and ends available with some fun metallic papers.

    2. Let the kids design any kind of robot they can imagine.

    3. When they have designed their robot hand out the lined paper and pencils and have them write a story about their robot.

    4. Glue the robot story to the back of the original robot creation and you’re all set!